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. u.s. missiles light the mediterranean sky. operation odyssey dawn under way. a coalition of western and arab states are unleashing strikes on libyan targets right now. the allies' goal, the stop moammar gadhafi from butchering his own citizens to stay in power. tonight, he shows no signs of backing down. at least not yet. a spokesman for his embattled government calls the allied attack "barbaric." good evening, i'm wolf blitzer in washington. we would like to welcome our viewers from around the world. this is a special edition of "the situation room," "target libya." but we begin with breaking news. cnn is live tonight across libya with what's going on. our senior international correspondent nic robertson is reporting from tripoli where sounds of attacks echoed through the night. and our correspondent arwa damon is with us, she's in benghazi where rebels have been trying to hold on to that city. let's get to both of them in just a moment. but first, in just the last hour, we've heard explosions and gunfire across tripoli. >> no word yet who exactly is behind it. it comes hours after
. that's how the u.s. defense secretary describes the operation so far but he also sounds a warning. in benghazi, the rebels celebrate as the libyan military calls for an immediate cease-fire. allied forces say they'll wait and see if this time that promise is genuine. >>> good evening. i'm wolf blitzer in washington. we want to welcome our viewers watching on cnn networks around the world. this is a cnn special, "libya war." tonight we're live from five continents as we cover the military movements, the political back-and-forth, and the diplomatic steps being taken against moammar gadhafi and his regime. here's what we know right now. a senior official with coalition forces tells cnn allies targeted a building in moammar gadhafi's compound in tripoli because it was connected to the command and control of libyan troops. there's no indication colonel gadhafi was inside the building. strikes on the north african nation are to continue despite calls by the libyan government for a stop to the fighting. allies don't trust that he will honor a cease-fire. on sunday some of those troops to
-fire declared on friday. u.s. joint chiefs chairman mike mullen says the u.n.'s no-fly zone is now in place. allied air strikes have done major damage according to another u.s. official. coalition planes are now patrolling the area to deter air attacks on civilians. the u.s., france and great britain have taken big roles in "operation odyssey dawn." italy, canada, spain, belgium, denmark, norway and qatar are also involved. >>> and cnn's nic robertson broke the news of the attack on gadhafi's compound. and we want to play what he and his crew captured on videotape without talking over it, and nic will update us on the other side. take a look. >> 10:30? 10:30. yeah. and those pictures from our nic robertson simply amazing. let's go to him now. nic? >> reporter: don, we were taken into moammar gadhafi's palace compound, a large secure area a couple of square miles. we were taken to a building, we could see the roof had been smashed, two big holes punched in it. we were told by cruise missiles. in fact, we were given some parts that were taken out of the building while we were there. this is a
was shot down. and our cnn team tells us in benghazi they've seen tanks and artillery rounds in several locations in and around the city. these latest events come just seven or eight hours after the libyan government told cnn it was observing u.n.-ordered cease-fire, which do not know if opposition or government forces. arwa damon is our correspondent who is in benghazi. we have much ground to cover. let's begin first of all with the current situation, the bombardment or the shelling that is taking place. is it still under way? >> as far as we are aware, richard, yes, it is still under way. gaud if i forces appear to have begun their assault on the city. we saw large plumes of dark smoke rising from that. we heard a number of explosions, we saw appeared to be several artillery rounds landing well within the city, as the center of the city itself. we saw a plane, one member of our crew saw that fighter jet you mentioned there, pummeling down from the sky in flames. but opposition fighter later telling us that that was, in fact, one of their aircraft. no way for us to independently confir
principles that have guided us through many storms. >> tonight as the president sold the american people on this mission of getting rid of gadhafi. is this country's role in the middle east changing? this is the great middle east debate. a special edition of piers morgan tonight. >> the really tough question tonight, does operation odyssey door signal a major change in america's foreign policy in that region? tonight the great middle east debate for some of the top minds in the country, both sides of the aisle. senator lindsay graham, donald trump. congressman anthony wiener, p.j. crowley. former libyan ambassador, general richard myers. we begin tonight with cnn's nick robertson live from tripoli. did anyone see the speech where you are? >> reporter: no one will have seen it on state television and there's been no comment on state television about it. they have chosen to broadcast a number of other things, reruns of political analysts putting forth the government position. but plenty of people you can be sure will have watched it on channels like cnn. they watch the international news o
from > i have to follow my old friend martha stewart because martha stewart keeps it -- >> i use twitter to keep in touch. >> countries and cultures are brought together like never before. >> who do hillary clinton, martha stewart, snoop dogg, alissa milano, and i have in common, along with millions of you? >> i'm using twitter to send pictures and thoughts from space. >> tonight, find out what all the twittering's about. if you're not on it, what are you missing? if you are on it, what you may not know that you ought to know. a generation is tweeting and making history. >>> tonight, twitter queens martha stewart and alissa milano on twitter. meet two people that invented twitter. a special live tweeting edition of @pierstonight. [ applause ] ♪ >>> good evening. and welcome to a special edition of "piers morgan tonight" with our live studio audience. with me, two rather special gentlemen who five years ago had the brilliant idea for twitter. co-founders biz stone and jack dorsey. [ applause ] >> 140 million people a day tweet, and in a short while i'm going to bring in some wor
. that is what the defense ministry has shown us. of course we know that super pumper operation is also under way on reactor three. this of course is where they are sucking water out of the ocean and continuously into another area and spraying through an extended arm some 22 meters high, directly into reactor three. this is happening continuously for the next seven hours. it will be unmanned. they have no issues as far as exposure to radiation. there 300 personnel on the ground working tirelessly to try and contain this situation they are of course trying to restore power to all six reactors. that happened to 2, 5, and 6, but the other four that is yet to happen. >> while they try to overt catastrophe, it almost overshadowed the other catastrophe which is the debacle from all of this. what is the latest on continued rescue efforts? any hope there and the situation with so many people in the shelters and whether they have enough support and splice to sustain them. >> the scale of this disaster continues to grow every single day. the death toll stands at 7,000 and that the toll of the missing is in
? >> reporter: well, we don't know where she is right now. the government officials have told us various stories in the past 24 hours. they said that she was taken to a mental hospital and then a few hours later they said she was at the police investigation headquarters where she was held to file charges where she had accused the men of raping her. she had been released to the care of her family and there were early indications at this stage that her family is saying they're not aware of that. the government has been -- to smear the imam's reputation. the spokesman, the government's spokesman on the record accusing her of being a prostitute. at the press conference i asked him about that statement. >> yes, nic? [ inaudible question ] >> you have been describing auto on. >> nic, could we not discuss her -- no, no. listen. nic -- nic -- nic -- could we please, this is a very -- nic, please. could we just -- to respect her, her daughter, her family, to respect -- this is a very conservative society. could we not expose her in public, please? could we let -- i mean, what do you care about, nic? not
us various stories in the past 24 hours. they said that she was being taken to a mental hospital. then a few hours she said she was at the politician investigation headquarters where she was being held to foul charges against the men she accuses of raping her and government officials said she was released to the care of her family. but there were early indications at this stage that is her family is saying they're not aware of that. the government has been at pains to smear obeida's reputation accusing her of being a prostitute. i asked him about that the statement. >> yes, nic. >> reporter: her family -- you have been on the record yourself describing her -- >> nic, can we not discuss her -- listen, nic, nic could we please? nic, please. could we just respect her, her daughter, her family. could we not expose her. not to embarrass me as i'm standing on the stand. what you care about, nic. if i said something, i said what i knew. i don't want to repeat anything i said. i'm not withdrawing from it. i don't want to make it even more -- even more public. this is a criminal case. thi
qaeda there and the people who have been found fighting on other soil against us that went there afterwards. >> that's where there has been a big al qaeda presence. we have been working with the government sending drones in. of course that came out in wikileaks he was lying to the public. thank you for joining me tonight. thank you for watching. piers morgan starts now. >>> tonight, the battle rages for libya. explosions and anti-aircraft fire over tripoli. coalition forces say gadhafi has been stopped for now. president obama says gadhafi must go. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> now the tough questions. what's the end game? who is really in charge? what do we know about the rebels and what happens if gadhafi won't go? also tonight, another arab regime on the ropes. is yemen the next to fall? and in japan, new fears over radiation and the food supply. is the already desperate population at greater risk? this is a special live edition of "piers morgan tonight" from london. good evening. breaking news from libya and shocking video uploaded to youtube today.
forces say gadhafi has been stopped for now. president obama says gadhafi must go. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> now the tough questions. what's the end game? who is really in charge? what do we know about the rebels and what happens if gadhafi won't go? also tonight, another arab regime on the ropes. is yemen the next to fall? and in japan, new fears over radiation and the food supply. is the already desperate population at greater risk? this is a special live edition of "piers morgan tonight" from london. good evening. breaking news from libya and shocking video uploaded to youtube today. cnn cannot independently confirm details of when or where it was shot but it shows civilians on a street being bombed. watch the scene. extraordinary footage of civilians being bombed in misurata. some were heard shouting before the explosion hit. we don't know what happened to the people closest to the explosion or who caused it. we have dramatic new video taken in tripoli showing tracer fire over the city. there have been a series of bombardments from allied forces towards colon
states and around the world. u.s. officials will assess the damage done so far in libya following the start of "odyssey dawn." firing fresh shots against moammar gadhafi's regime. u.s. and uk forces followed suit with more than 100 cruise missile hits. moammar gadhafi is asking people around the world to stand by his rejeenlg. colonel gadhafi and his supporters call the coalition strike naked aggression by "bar bake ircrusaders." american, french and uk forces are enforcing a no-fly zone. u.s. president barack obama says the use of force was necessary but not the allies' first choice. explosions and anti-aircraft fire thundered in the skies above tripoli early sunday. it may have been part of another round of cruise missile attacks by allied forces, though that is still unclear. nic robertson was speaking with cnn's don lemon as it happened and here's part of their conversation just earlier. >> reporter: it's still going on at the moment. i'm going to get a little closer. yeah, you might be able to hear it now. >> we can, we can. let's listen a bit, nic. >> that's the sounds of he
generators and plant officials are using seawater to try to stop the meltdowns. stan grant is at our tokyo bureau. he joins us now with the latest on that. stan, just the term "meltdown" i know stay pretty modern term in japan and local communities but just explain at what threat is. >> reporter: yeah it is certainly one of those -- words meltdown. the language being used talking about the likelihood of a meltdown in the reactor number one at the daiichi plant and the possibility of a meltdown in reactor number three. that's two reactors in the same plant. you know there obviously was some nervousness and some edginess about actually using that language as -- as in the early stages of this emergency but now they're coming to grips with the possibility of that. what's happening here essentially when you use this term meltdown is that the reactor is exposed. there's not enough water to cover it. it continues to generate heat buy. like a kettle. that is exposed as the water level drops and it raises the prospect of disintegration. now when you talk about a meltdown, of course it brings to min
this sunday morning with "operation odyssey dawn" well under way. french, u.s., and british coalition forces began hammering key libyan installations late on saturday to enforce a no-fly zone newly approved by the u.n. security council. responding to the fighter jets and cruise missiles, moammar gadhafi's defenses have been peppering libya's skies with anti-aircraft fire. here now the very latest. the pentagon saying that so far, more than 100 u.s. and british tomahawk cruise missiles have slammed into libyan targets aimed primarily at air defense systems. despite the ways of attacks libyan leader gadhafi remains defiant, condemning the coalition strikes and urging people around the world to aid in libya's defense. the british prime minister, david cameron, calls the allied effort against colonel gadhafi the right thing to do. britain's defense secretary says british fighter jets flew 4,800 kilometers from their base in southeastern england to their targets in libya. the country's longest bombing run since the 1982 falklands war. prime minister cameron says the uk's involvement is justified.
in hong kong welcoming this hour, our viewers in the u.s. as around the world. well, there are also reports of more trouble at the nuclear plant in fukushima. japanese media are reporting the cooling system has stopped at one of the reactors there. let's get straight to stan grant. he is following that story from our tokyo bureau, and he joins us live now. stan? >> reporter: yeah, this continues to grow, doesn't it, andrew? this entire nuclear emergency. it seems to be one development after another. and none of them particularly good. we're hearing now about the number 2 reactor at the daiichi nuclear plant. this makes three of the reactors there, 1, 2, and 3 that are experiencing these cooling problems. now this information is being reported in japanese media and they're closing the nuclear safety agency. we have yet to hear directly from them. but we're hearing that the number 2 reactor is now having cooling problems. let me throw you back to a couple of hours ago. of course there was an explosion in the number 3 reactor. that was a hydrogen explosion in the outer building, which
to be no letup in the fear that's gripping the disaster stricken nation. tokyo is now requesting help from the u.s. military in this emergency. we want to bring you all we know so far. japanese officials say part of a nuclear reactor containment vessel at the fukushima daiichi power plant may be damaged. they say a breach in the containment vessel in reactor number three may be what's caused a white cloud of smoke or steam to rise above the power plant. they can't confirm either way on that. now, already, there have been several explosions and fires at the plant since friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. workers have been trying to stop a nuclear meltdown by cooling those damaged reactors from which radiation has escaped. however, officials say workers have now suspended their operations, and have been evacuated. authorities also say radiation readings at fukushima daiichi have been fluctuating by the hour. the nuclear watch dogs say radiation briefly reached 167 times the average annual dose on tuesday. but japan's government said it quickly fell back to levels that pose no risks. even so, ev
? >> caller: we are not -- we haven't expected things to speed up this quickly. to be honest, most of us are still in trauma. we're shocked. we're all home. we're scared. i don't know what's going to happen next. we're not scared for what the international community or what the -- the flight strike, we're scared of the other strikes. >> forgive me for pushing harder. in what way? i mean what's your fear basically here? >> caller: my personal fear is for his speech to come true in tripoli where he said he's going to come to each house, each room in each house to kill them. to be honest, i'm scared for my life. >> which is understandable. this comment that opened the arms supply, arm the people so that they can fight back, is this something that people like yourself take seriously? >> caller: not at all. i think he's trying to add what we call a psychological war to intimidate people to say that he is still in command, which is a truth everybody had woken up with, that he's falling. he's falling very fast. he's no longer in command. >> you see, you say that. and let's just explore that for
the problems with the plant and he joins us now from tokyo. we're getting different information from different experts at this point. wa do you know on the ground? >> becky, this has been developing rapidly in the past few hours. let's look at the chronology of this because this is important. we can end up getting our wires crossed here and this is a fluent situation. you have the earthquake, a big quake that obviously has an impact on the nuclear reactors. they shut down. that is a precautionary measure. but then there were complications with the power source and that has caused this inability to cool the reactor. the reactor overheating. there have been reports it's almost three times as hot as it normally should be. then in an establishment to cool the reactor, the nuclear agency here released some steam, tried to release the pressure, conceding that some radioactive material did seep into the atmosphere. they also did skip into this inclusion zone. they are still insisting that the radioactive exposure is not high. however, according to officials, 1,000 microof activity have escaped into t
't want us looking at too closely, appeared to be bombs or missiles or some type of description. what the government was saying was that this essentially is not a valid target because they were saying it's a training -- it did have training and repair areas that we saw. but it also had these missile systems that were used by the navy. they were navy equipment. so this very much a military site, piers. >> there are regular reports in the last 24 hours that at least one, maybe two of gadhafi's sons have been killed in recent bombings. what do you know about that? >> reporter: i don't put any faith in those reports. we've heard those reports circulating around the pick -- picked up by many of the opposition. it's perhaps wishful thinking on their part. that this -- the regime would be going down. at one point a few days ago, there was talk that a fighter jet had crashed on that palace compound, and that had led to the death of a couple of gadhafi's sons. there's no evidence to support that. and certainly from what we're hearing from the sons that are talking if not directly, indirectly t
by a giant wave of water along what used to be a city street. incredibly, the driver survives. after the floodwaters recede, the devastation is stunning. a woman confronted with the ruins of her home. no words, just tears. [ crying ] >> in the midst of a tragedy this magnitude, even a joyous event like the birth of a baby, is bittersweet. >> translator: when the baby was born, it was right after i heard that the bodies of 200 to 300 people were washed up. so rather than happiness, i felt a twinge of guilt, and i cried. but i'm happy. it's just with mixed feelings. >> and in perhaps the most astonishing images of all, people running for their lives, literally, as the tsunami sweeps through their town. let's begin with the latest from japan. here's my colleague, anderson cooper. >> reporter: day five this disaster. and the problems keep on growing, it seems. a fire break out in reactor number four at the fukushima daiichi plant. the plant that has six reactors. virtually all of them have had problems over the last several days. there are now deep concerns about the spent fuel rods in r
are without power. we have a cnn team headed to the quake zone. what can you tell us, paula? >> just seconds before you came to me there was another tsunami warning. there is a siren followed by a woman announcing get out of the evacuation area immediately. we have seen some cars leaving this area. they're taking these warnings very seriously. this is why we're not that close to the water itself. it shows that this is an ongoing situation. there are still people in these areas and there are still the threat of further tsunamis, obviously with the aftershocks that come from such a huge earthquake, 8.9 earthquake, are going be sizable in themselves. that will trigger concerns that it could trigger another tsunami. there are cars that have just been twisted into piles of metal there on top of each other. some of them are twisted around polls. further down closer to the water you can see cars that have been smashed into buildings, but buildings are still standing. you can see a huge, thick black plume of smoke. we have tried to go closer but the tsunami warnings are keeping us away from the wate
grant is at our tokyo bureau and he joins us with the very latest. stan, a couple of hours ago the japanese ambassador to the u.s. told our own wolf blitzer that he didn't know of any sort of meltdown. so we seem to be getting different variations of information. what can you tell us, to help clarify the situation? >> reporter: look, the information really has been open to wide interpretation and, of course, with this unfolding nuclear emergency, which is now into its second day since the quake knocked out the cooling system at the daiichi plant, this really is about how people see the events and how they interpret some of these factors. we've heard the word meltdown being used. we have heard partial meltdown, talking about the casing of the reactor melting. also talk about this cesium, which is a nuclear part cal which has seeped into the atmosphere. that normally is found restricted within the core of the reactor. the fact that that was zee tede the atmosphere gave rise to belief the casing of the reactor itself was being melted down. people are putting different weight on th
was in an area a couple hours ago that used to be a rice field. we were walking along. there is no way you could tell it was farmland. it was this complete debris field. and what was amazing is that the debris was probably at least ten feet thick. so there was really no way to tell if there were people whose bodies were buried inside all that debris. finally, some japanese soldiers came and they didn't have dogs or heavy earth moving equipment. they just had sticks. they were kind of basically going around by smell trying to locate people. so it's going to be a number of days before they really get a sense of what the actual death toll is, how many people are actually missing at this point. you know, we're still very much early days in this. obviously the whole nuclear issue, you know, gives a whole other level of fear. what's interesting when you go around to like water distribution centers or places where people are lined up for food, there's not pandemonium. there's not -- you don't hear people arguing and yelling at each other or fighting with each other, complaining about their place in lin
contamination. that is in addition to 19 injured and some missing at the plant. they've been using helicopters and water cannons to cool the reactors. officials say the results have been unclear. the other breaking news story tonight is the u.n. security council has voted to impose a no-fly zone and other measures over libya to try to stop gadhafi's advancement from -- stopping forces from getting any further toward the city of benghazi. i want to go to the u.n. and richard roth. also we have nic robertson in tripoli. we'll try to make contact shortly with the opposition-held city of benghazi in eastern libya. richard roth at the u.n., what exactly does this security council resolution permit? >> anderson, it means that at any time military force might be used against colonel gadhafi and his troops. the resolution authorizes all necessary means to enforce a no-fly ban over libya, which was voted on by the security council. ten countries in favor, five absensegse -- abstentions, no vetoes. the resolution promises there will be no foreign occupation. it's up to member countries of the u.n. to de
voices for energy policy and alternate sources. thank you for joining us. and will cain, thank you for being here. and thank you for watching. good night from new york, "piers morgan tonight" starts right now. >>> tonight, fresh quakes rock japan as workers race against the clock to stop a complete nuclear disaster. it's worse than three mile island. as damaged reactors leak radiation, shell-shocked residents are tested for dangerous exposure. fear is spreading around the globe. now will a worried world turn its back on nuclear energy? >>> and new, extraordinary stories of survival and desperate tragedy. >> translator: i have a bad leg so my wife was behind me, cheering me on, saying, "one, two, one, two. the voice stopped. so i looked back, and she was not there. she's dead." >> more than 10,000 people dead or still unaccounted for. >> translator: when the baby was born, it was right after i heard that the bodies of 200, 300 people were washed up. rather than happiness, i felt a twinge of guilt. >> hopes dim for more rescues. >> all six people who were behind me were washed away.
. what can you tell us about that? >> well, it seems that the french aircraft that spotted this libyan aircraft, as far as we know the type of aircraft that's a trainer aircraft used for training pilots who are going to move on to fighter jets, it was on the ground or just landed in misurata where the coalition had been targeting gadhafi forces who had been pummelling opposition forces inside the city of misurata. on the air field outside, that's when the french jet saw this small aircraft. that's when it targeted it on the runway. this seems to be the only time, according to coalition officials, that they've been able to see gadhafi's air force try and take to the air in the past five days, piers. >> and do you get a sense of the no-fly zone as having much of an impact on gadhafi and his regime? >> reporter: it seems to be having an impact around misurata. this is the only place it seems to be having a significant impact. we know that because opposition people in the city there say the attacks have decreased. they're getting some electricity. it's going to be restored to them. and peo
the metaphor. that will have impact. thank you for the insight. thank you very much to you for joining us "in the arena." good night from new york. "piers morgan tonight" starts right now. >>> oh, my god! the building's going to fall! >> tonight, apocalypse japan. one of the biggest earthquakes in modern history. miles of devastation. [ crashing sounds ] >> spectacular eyewitness accounts. >> it just blew up! >> what is the fallout from damaged nuclear reactors? and tsunami, nature's most incredible force. i'll talk with one man who's seen it all close up and litc d -- and lived to tell the story. tonight, are natural disasters on the rise? what if it happens here? is this country prepared for the unthinkable? live from los angeles, this is a special edition of "piers morgan tonight." good evening. i'm live from a city that's suffered numerous earthquakes but never any as big as the one that struck japan yesterday. japan right now, it's mitt morni mid morning. the extent of devastation is becoming clearer. look at the tsunami that struck at 2:46, the strong toast hit japan in recorded histor
only one drop was successful. they said spent fuel reactor in four does have water. the u.s. government says the situation is much worse than the japanese government is saying. president obama spoke with the japanese prime minister promising additional help if needed. that's the latest information we have on the ground. our coverage continues. thanks for watching. i'll see you tomorrow. >>> tonight, nuclear nightmare. the u.s. government says a radiation leak at reactor number 4 at the fukushima plant is even worse than thought. shell-shocked japanese crowd into shelters wondering what's next. >> translator: i am deeply concerned that the current nuclear plant situation is critical. >> while a handful of heroic power plant reactors risk it all. >> translator: he indicated a serious situation. he told her to take care of herself because he won't be home for awhile. >> and my special report from the middle east. tonight's show comes from here, israel. what's extraordinary when you come here is the proximity of everything. to my right ramallah. to my left jerusalem. just a few
does this security council resolution permits? >> it means that any time military force might be used against chronicle duffy and his troops. the resolution authorizes all necessary means to enforce a no-fly ban over libya which was voted on by the security council. ten countries in favor, five extensions. no deal. the resolution promises there will be no foreign occupation. it is up to member countries of the u.n. to decide how they're going to participate to enforce the no-fly zone. no planes over libya except humanitarian flights or planes taking foreign nationals out. anderson? >> dramatic developments at the u.n. let's go to libya. nic robertson is reporting from tripoli as he has been for many weeks now under great personal risk to he and his crew. how concerned is the gadhafi's regime? you got a call earlier from one of his sons? >> reporter: incredibly, as the u.n. was counting down to the minutes before this vote, the ambassadors were speaking at security council, moammar gadhafi please son said we have a new plant. we will not use the army and then gauzy. they will encircle
the area. meanwhile, we've heard talk of a potential meltdown which stan mentioned, the words used are partial or likely but that's doing little to calm nervous evacuees, listen to what they're saying about the situation. >> translator: i want to know exactly what's going on at the nuclear plant. i'm scared. >> translator: i don't understand this at all but i'm scared because i can see the radiation. >> there are measures people can take to protect themselves against radiation. a cnn's dr. sanjay gupta explains why taking iodine tablets could help. >> reporter: it can take up the radioactive iodine. this is an important concept. if you give a stable iodide, you're sort of flooding the thyroid with this stable component and even if there is an exposure to this element, it doesn't get taken up by the thyroid because the thyroid is all full of stable iodine. that's sort of the fury here. it seems to work well. it's simple iodine tablets. now, that's not going to work after someone has been exposed. that's not going to necessarily protect people against other effects of radiation poiso
we're just clever in that way. nobody has ever asked us, piers. >> that can't be true. >> i'm not kidding. have you ever been asked? >> i think on good morning england. we were never in the same place. we love you so much. i do. she just met you. >> we're friends. >> i'm very jealous of you. >> sitting here together how do you feel about doing a joint interview? >> it's really fun. we both said we would have fun with it. we both like you. i think i like you. i'll let you know at the end of this. >> passed one test with joan. >> you did? >> i thought it was so terrific. i think you're doing a great job. i've been watching all your interviews. i loved it when you asked hugh hefner's girlfriend what does she see in him? >> both of you ladies experimented in the genre of toy boys. what do you think? >> i haven't seen hefner do his think. good for him. >> does age matter any more? does anybody think? >> no. i don't think anybody does. >> age is unimportant unless you're a bottle of wine. look at me. fabulous. >> you both look absolutely fabulous. >> we've had absolutely beautiful
obviously. about 15 minutes before 3:00, half the orchestra was on stage. some of us were backstage. i was backstage and up one flight in the dressing room. and we get earthquakes a lot in japan, you know. i've been here for ten years, and it's not uncommon to get, you know, tremors every once in a while. it started off pretty slow. i thought, you know, no biggee, it's just going to be one of the usual ones. and then, you know, after a few seconds, it just got bigger and bigger. and the people around me, my colleagues, some that are -- all of them that are japanese that have been here forever and experienced lots of earthquakes, you could suddenly see in their eyes that oh, no, man, this is huge. it just started to get bigger and bigger. you really couldn't -- i tried to get up, and the floor was shaking so much that it was hard to even stand. and it just started shaking like crazy. there's a tv monitor that you could actually see on to the stage. and you could see just the lights swinging around. i mean flashing all over the walls. i mean, it looked like a discotheque. it was just goi
. >> absolutely. richard lloyd parry, editor for the times. thank you for talking with us and explaining your experience there as this 8.9 earthquake struck where you are. and you have made the decision to stay safely in that building. just for a moment, let's listen in to nhk coverage. nhk tv there in japan. and listen to what they're able to report at this point. >> reporter: heads of the various political parties, our secretary general and our -- vice deputy president are seeking cooperation from other parties. and the other political parties given the situation, i have not been in could not tack with the other party leaders but i am sure that we will have their understanding. so what does that mean? for a while, the deliberations will be suspended? details about that, our party officials are getting together with other party officials to discuss the matter. the opposition and the people's new party. the details will be taken care of by the party officials who are meeting. you mentioned the aftershocks and the second and third waves. what you ask the people of japan to do. first regarding
of the world is saying we don't want more nukes. this poses a lot of tough energy problems for us. gloria, thanks so much, will, a regular, great to have you here. thanks so much for joining us in "in the arena." good night. "piers morgan tonight" starts right now. >>> tonight, nuclear nightmare. the u.s. government says a radiation leak at reactor number 4 at the fukushima plant is even worse than thought. shell-shocked japanese crowd into shelters wondering what's next. >> translator: i am deeply concerned that the current nuclear plant situation is critical. >> while a handful of heroic power plant reactors risk it all. >> translator: he indicated a serious situation. he told her to take care of herself because he won't be home for awhile. >> and my special report from the middle east. tonight's show comes from here, israel. what's extraordinary when you come here is the proximity of everything. to my right ramallah. to my left jerusalem. just a few miles separating these feuding neighbors. even more extraordinarily this may well be the calmest place in the whole of the middle east rig
democrats that fled the state came back home last saturday. thank you very much for joining us "in the arena" tonight. good night from new york. "piers morgan tonight" starts right now. >>> tonight, three explosive flashpoints. libya, president obama threatens force. >> if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. >> gadhafi says there's a cease-fire, but the fighting rages on. >> there is no cease-fire. tell the world there is no cease-fire. he is killing people in mizurata now. >> japan's nuclear nightmare. turns out the danger is greater than first thought. >> the situation surrounding the accident is still very grave. >> and tonight, a man inside the fukushima plant when the earthquake hit. i'll ask him how he got out alive. >>> and israel, more from my exclusive interview with a surprisingly emotional prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> they're given a pass, the palestinian authority. and i say stop giving them a pass. >>> and i'll ask the chief plo representative to the united states if he can make peace with netanyahu. this is
of thousands of his own people. he used chemical weapons on his own people and he invaded and started war with iran and invaded kuwait. he was a brutal, brutal, brutal, vicious dictator. gadhafi. you can see what he is about. now the plus on gadhafi was that after he saw what happened to saddam hussein, he decided he didn't want to be saddam hussein and gave up his nuclear program. we would be in a worse situation today if he had nuclear weapons. >> there was a famous bit of footage of you meeting saddam hussein in the '80s. when you see this, do you feel uncomfortable when you watch it? >> no, not at all. president reagan and secretary of state shultz and i talked and made a decision that he was in a war with iran. and that it was -- he did not have diplomatic relations with them since the middle east war, and that it might make sense to reach out. in fact, diplomatic relations were re-established during the reagan administration. shortly after my visit. it's too bad. it makes me wonder how he might have taken a different turn in his life, and been a better leader for his country and --
>>> e.d. and will, thanks for being here. thanks for joining us "in the arena." piers morgan starts right now. >>> tonight -- >> i, donald h. rumsfeld -- >> secretary of defense to two presidents, the man at the center of every major decision of the bush administration, rumsfeld on iraq, weapons of mass destruction, and the aftermath of two wars. >> there are known kboenowns, te are known unknowns, that is to say we know there are thing we know. and there are unknown unknowns, things we don't know we don't know. >> that is then, this is now. donald rumsfeld in his own words. this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> mr. secretary, welcome. thank you for coming in. i want to start probably obviously with libya, extraordinary scenes involving muammar gadhafi who, he pitched up at a hotel in tripoli, said nothing to reporter. just came in and left soon afterwards. seeing the pictures now, bizarre scenes. you were a middle east envoy for the united states. when you see what's going on, not just in libya now but also in the middle east, do you quite believe it? >> well, you can. i mean, you th
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